Hammer, Sickle, and Star Ṭarīqaẗ ʾal–Bāhuwiyyaẗ in Arabic calligraphy Fist
Ṭarīqaẗ ʾal–Bāhuwiyyaẗ of
The Multiversal Communist Collective
Mōšẹh ʾẠhărōn hạ-Lēwiy bẹn Hẹʿrəšẹʿl
Pír ʾaw Muršid Pír ʾaw Muršid Pír ʾaw Muršid Pír ʾaw Muršid Pír ʾaw Muršid
The Muliversal Communist Collective
Ḥaḍ°rat Sul°ṭān Bāhū (AS)
Ṭarīqaẗ ʾal–Bāhuwiyyaẗ of The Multiversal Communist Collective™ (MP3)—a puppet nation attached to The Dialectical metaRealist Ṣạdiyqiym of Democratic Communist Federation (Spartakusland)™—belongs, on NationStates, to The Confederation of Traditional Socialist Nations and to The World Assembly. Moreover, the confederation is a signatory to The Vanguard Treaty. Ṭarīqaẗ ʾal–Bāhuwiyyaẗ™, Path of Bāhūism, governs The Multiversal Communist Collective™ through a radical proletarian democracy. The genre fuses science–fiction, Islamic studies (Arabic/ʿArabiyyaẗ, دِّرَاسات الإسْلاميّة [MP3], Ddirāsāt ʾal–⫰Is°lāmiyyaẗ), Marxism–Luxemburgism (MP3), Antifa (MP3), and Bhaskarian critical realism (MP3).
Ṭarīqaẗ ʾal–Bāhuwiyyaẗ (Arabic, طَرِيقَة َلبَاهُوِيَّة [MP3]), the namesake of Ḥaḍ°rat Sul°ṭān Bāhū (Perso–Arabic, حَضْرَت سُلْطَان بَاهُو [MP3]), ʿalay°hi ʾal–ssalām (Arabic, عَلَيْهِ السَّلَام [MP3], “peace be upon Him” or “AS”), was established as a Western branch of the Bāhū’s (AS) Punjabi (Persian/Fār°sí, پَنْجَابِی [MP3], Pan°ǧābí; and ʾUr°dū and Shahmukhi Punjabi/Šāh Muḱ°hí Pun°ǧābí, پُنْجَابِی [MP3], Pun°ǧābí) Sār°vārí–i Qād°riýah–i Ṣūfí–i Ṭaríqat (Perso–Arabic/Fārisiyyaẗ–ʿArabiyyaẗ, سَارْوَارِیِ قَادْرِیَهِ صُویفِیِ طَرِيقَت [MP3]) or Ṭarīqaẗ ʾal–Qādiriyyaẗ ʾal–Sar°wariyyaẗ (Arabic, طَرِيقَة القَادرِيَّة السَرْوَرِيَّة [MP3]). Ṭarīqaẗ ʾal–Bāhuwiyyaẗ enters the sil°silaẗ (Arabic, سِلْسِلَة [MP3]), “chain”) of Qād°riyyaẗ (Arabic, قَدَرِيَّة [MP3], “fatalism” or “determinism”).
According to tradition, ʿAb°d ʾal–Qad°r ʾal–Ǧīlāniyy (Arabic, عَبد القَادْر الجِيلَانِيّ [MP3]), the Ṣūfiyy forebear of Bāhū’s (AS) own ṭarīqaẗ, was the founder (Arabic, الإِمَام [MP3] ʾal–⫰imām, “the pathfinder”) of Qād°riyyaẗ. Etymologically:
  • ʿAb°d (Arabic, عَبْد [MP3) is “servant” or “slave.”
  • Qād°riyyaẗ is a form of Qadir (Arabic, قَدِر [MP3]) or Qad°r (Arabic, قَادْر [MP3]), “capable one” or “competent one.” Qadir, from ʿAb°d ʾal–Qad°r ʾal–Ǧīlāniyy, is one of the 99 names of ʾAllꞌah (Arabic, اللّه [MP3], “the God”), sub°ḥān°h wa–taʿātaỳ (Arabic, سُبْحَانْه وَتَعَالَى [MP3], “glorified and exalted be He” or “SWT”)
  • Ǧílān (Persian, جِيلَان [MP3]), “courtier,” is a city in Iran (Persian, اِیْرَان) [MP3], ʾIý°rān).
  • Ṭarīqaẗ (Arabic, طَرِيقَة [MP3]) or ṭaríqat (Persian and ʾUr°dū, طَرِيقَت [MP3]) is “path” or, by implication, “order.”
  • Sār°vārí (Persian, سَارْوَارِی [MP3]), sārawārí (ʾUr°dū, سَارَوَارِی [MP3]), saravārī (Hindi/Hiṃdī, सरवारी [MP3]), or saravarī (Guramukhi Punjabi/Guramukhī Pajābī, ਸਰਵਰੀ [MP3] is “chiefship”)
Bāhū (AS) was born in the Punjabi village of Angah (ʾUr°dū, انْگَہ [MP3], An°gāh), Soon Valley (ʾUr°dū, وَادْیِ سُون [MP3], Wād°ý–i Sūn), Khushab District (ʾUr°dū, ضِلَع خُوشَابَ [MP3], Ḍilaʿ H̱ūšāba), which is located in today’s Pakistan (ʾUr°dū and Shahmukhi Punjabi, پَاكِسْتَانَ [MP3], Pākis°tāna, “land of the pure”). Indeed, He spent His entire life, circa 1628–1691, in present–day Pakistan’s portion of a not–yet–divided Punjab (ʾUr°dū, پَنْجَابَ [MP3], Pan°ǧāba; Shahmukhi Punjabi, پَنْجَابَ [MP3], Pan°ǧāba; or Guramukhi Punjabi, ਪੰਜਾਬ [MP3], Pajāba, land offive rivers”):
Map of the Punjab
Garh Maharaja (ʾUr°dū, گَڑْھَ مَہَارَاجَا [MP3], Gaṛ°ha Mahārāǧā, “Fort of the Great King”) is a municipality belonging to Pakistan’s Punjab. That blessed city serves as the capital of Ṭarīqaẗ ʾal–Bāhuwiyyaẗ of The Multiversal Communist Collective. Most importantly, however, the building which houses the shrine and mausoleum of Ḥaḍ°rat Sul°ṭān Bāhū (AS) is located in Garh Maharaja:
Ḥaḍ°rat Sul°ṭān Bāhū’s Shrine
This fanciful collective and its mythical ṭarīqaẗ celebrates the South Asian Bhakti–Ṣūfiyy movement (Sanskrit/Saṃskrtam, भक्ति [MP3], bhakti, “involvementwith the beloved; and Arabic, صُوفِيّ, Ṣūfiyy [MP3], wearingwoolengarments), circa 800–1700 A.D. Indeed, my personal prototype, or ideal type, for devotion is the Bhakti or Bhakti–Ṣūfiyy movement. The adorational center, or flowering, of the Golden Age of Islam (Arabic, إسْلَام [MP3], ⫰Is°lām, peaceful surrender) might be found in this heart–centered movement. It arose chiefly from within subaltern, or marginalized, peasant populations of diverse faiths in South Asia, including the Indus Valley.
To put it another way, Sufism principally developed in South Asia. The extended association between devotional Hindus [Sanskrit, हिंदुओं [MP3] Hiṃduoṃ, “rivers” or “oceans”] and Muslims [Arabic, مُسْلِمُونَ [MP3], Mus°limūna, “peacefully surrendering ones”] was largely responsible for this wonderfully transcendent phenomenon. Although aspects of the Bhakti–Ṣūfiyy movement have been carried forward in some contemporary spiritual organizations, the final and unfortunate breakup of India into two, and then three, countries in the 20ᵗʰ century signaled the end of the movement’s prominence as a compelling social force in South Asia. I have produced two relevant podcasts (MP3) for The Dr. Mark Foster Show.
Listen to this delightful Hindu (Sanskrit, हिंदू [MP3], Hiṃdū, “river” or “ocean”) bhakti song (MP3). The ecstasy of infatuation, rather than the tragedy of legalism, galvanized this enlightened era of interfaith amity. Given the syncretism of the Bhakti–Ṣūfiyy movement, terms from ʾUr°dū, Punjabi, Sanskrit, Hindi, and so forth are scattered throughout the manuscript. The parent order of Ṭarīqaẗ ʾal–Bāhuwiyyaẗ, the Sār°vārí–i Qād°riýah–i Ṣūfí–i Ṭaríqat, was, moreover, integral to both the potency and continuity of that movement.
Yet, the Bhakti–Ṣūfiyy movement’s regional and even Western influence has endured, albeit with considerably diminished influence, to the present. Here is some background information concerning its illustrious history:
The Bhakti–Sufi movement was … [a] major pan–Indian articulation … of subaltern dissent.
The spokesmen/women of the movement mostly came from the subaltern or marginalised sections of society and were workers, women or Muslims …. Sultan Bahu … and other Sufi poets were Muslims by birth.
〜 K. Satchidanandan, “Between Saints and Secularists.” Belonging. Volume II. Issue 3. Undated. No pagination.
An important landmark in the cultural history of medieval India [Hindi, इंडिया, Iṃḍiyā [MP3], “river” or “ocean”] was the silent revolution in society brought about by a galaxy of socio-religious reformers, a revolution known as the Bhakti Movement. This movement was responsible for many rites and rituals associated with the worship of God by Hindus, Muslims and Sikhs [Guramukhi Punjabi, ਸਿੱਖਾਂ [MP3], Sikhāṁ] of [the] Indian subcontinent. For example, Kirtan [Sanskrit, कीर्तन [MP3], kīrtana, “telling”] at a Hindu Temple, Qawaali [ʾUr°dū, قَوُّالِی [MP3], qawwālí, “utterance”] at a Dargah [Persian, دَرْگَه [MP3], dar°gah, “threshold” or, by implication, shrine] (by Muslims), and singing of Gurbani [Guramukhi Punjabi, ਗੁਰਬਾਣੀ [MP3], gurabāṇī, “wise speech”] at a Gurdwara [Guramukhi Punjabi, ਗੁਰਦੁਆਰਾ [MP3], guraduꞌārā, “door to the guru”], are all derived from the Bhakti movement of medieval India (800–1700) ….
Sufism represents the inward or esoteric side of Islam or the mystical dimension of Muslim [Arabic, مُسْلِم, Mus°lim, “peacefully surrendering one”] religion. However, the Sufi saints transcending all religious and communal distinctions, worked for promoting the interest of humanity at large. The Sufis [Arabic, صُوفِيُّونَ [MP3], Ṣūfiyyūna] were a class of philosophers remarkable for their religious catholicity …. It [Sufism] rebelled against all forms of religious formalism, orthodoxy, falsehood and hypocrisy and endeavoured to create a new world order in which spiritual bliss was the only and the ultimate goal ….
… Sultan Bahu (ca 1628–1691) was a Muslim Sufi and saint who founded the Sarwari Qadiri Sufi order. Sultan Bahu was born in Anga, Soon Valley, in the Punjab Province of Pakistan. Like many other Sufi saints of South Asia Sultan Bahu was a prolific writer. More than forty books on Sufism are attributed to him, mostly in Persian.
〜 Arun Joshi, “Bhakti Movement in India and Punjab.” The Times of India. Undated. No pagination.
India saw a remarkable fusion of Islamic [Arabic, إِسْلَامِيَّة [MP3], ⫰Is°lāmiyyaẗ] and indigenous Hindu traditions, giving rise to a rich composite culture.… One of the best representatives of this confluence of traditions is the Bhakti-Sufi movement, a form of personal piety that challenged the hegemony of the religious orthodoxy and crusaded against caste and community divisions and meaningless ritualism.
A wealth of literature abounds with the teachings and writings of these Hindu and Sufi mystics ….
〜 Laxmi G. Tewari, “Common Grounds between Bhajan and Qawwali.‧ Conference on Music in the World of Islam. Assilah. August 8ᵗʰ–13ᵗʰ, 2007. Assilah, Morocco. Page 1–3. Retrieved on August 17ᵗʰ, 2013.
Ḥaḍ°rat Sul°ṭān Bāhū (AS) was, truly, among the leading Exemplars of the Bhakti–Ṣūfiyy movement. The name Bāhū, “with ʾAllꞌah” (SWT), was a portmanteau by His mother, Bíbí Rās°tí (Persian, بِیبِی رَاسْتِی [MP3], “Grande Dame [MP3] Truth”), ssalām ʾAllꞌah ʿalay°hā (Arabic, سَّلَام الله عَلَيْهَا [MP3], “peace of ʾAllꞌah be upon her” or “SAA”). Linguistically, Bāhū (AS), was derived by her from the Indo–European “bā” (Persian, بَا [MP3], “with”) and the Semitic “Hū” (Arabic, هُو [MP3], “He,” i.e., ʾAllꞌah (SWT), ). For being the sanctified, virtuous, and loving mother of Bāhū (SA), Bíbí Rāstí (SAA) abides, without question, in the company of the most blessed women to have inhabited the Earth.
With one dot, Bā Hū [Perso–Arabic, بَا هُو [MP3], “With He”) becomes Yā Hū [Arabic, يَا هُو [MP3]), “O He”] ….
And Bāhū is always steeped in the remembrance of Yā Hū.
〜 Ḥaḍ°rat Sul°ṭān Bāhū. Source unknown. Undated.
Inspired by my personally transformative experiences with Bāhū (AS), I became associated, though never formally involved as a member, with no less than ten Ṣūfiyy, Ṣūfiyy–influenced, or Muslim–inspired organizations, including:
  1. American Sufi Institute (discussed in the following section)
  2. Bawa Muhaiyaddeen Fellowship (Tamiḻ with my version of “fellowship” added, பாவா முஹையுத்தீன் தோழமை [MP3], Pāvā Muhaiyuttīṉ Tōḻamai)
  3. Naqshbandi Order of Sheikh Taoshobuddha (my ʾUr°dūization, نَقْشْبَنْدِی طَرِیقَتَِ شَیْخَ تَاؤْشُوبُْدّْھَا [MP3], Naq°š°ban°dí Ṭaríqata–i Šaý°ẖa Tā⫯w°šūbuddhā). I developed an association on June 11ᵗʰ, 2011.
  4. Naqshbandiyya Nazimiyya Sufi Order of America (my ʾUr°dūization, نَقْشْبَنْدِیَّہ نَاظمِیَّہ صُوفِی طَرِیقَتَِ امْرِیکَہ [MP3], Naq°šban°diýýah Nāẓimiýýah Ṣūfí Ṭaríqata–i ʾAm°ríḱā). I developed an association on December 14ᵗʰ, 2009, and, again, on April 22ʳᵈ, 2010 (through two different websites belonging to the same order).
  5. Naqshbandi Mujaddadi Sardari Tariqah (ʾUr°dū, نَقْشْبَنْدِی مُجَدَّدِی سَرْدَارِی طَرِیقَتَ [MP3], Naq°š°ban°dí Muǧaddadí Sar°dārí Ṭaríqata). I developed an association on April 23ʳᵈ, 2010.
  6. The Golden Sufi Center. I was accepted directly by Llewellyn Vaughan–Lee, through an emailed response to a phone call, on June 27ᵗʰ, 2011.
    Dear Mark
    Thank you for your e-mail and enquiry. You ask about having a teacher. You are very welcome to travel with us on this path. When you have come come and visit here in Inverness.
    With best wishes
    Llewellyn
    Ps. Thank you for your excellent Sufi web site.
  7. Lahore Ahmadiyya Movement for the Propagation of Islam (ʾUr°dū, احمَ;دِیَّہَ انْجُمَنَ اِشَاعَتَِ اِسْلَامَ لَاہُورَ [MP3], ʾAḥ°madiýýaha ʾAn°ǧumana ʾIšāʿata–i ʾIs°lāma Lāhūra). I developed an association on January 23ʳᵈ, 2010.
  8. The Rose Sufi Crescent
  9. United Submitters International of Rašād H̱alīfaẗ or Rashad Khalifa (Arabic, رَشَاد خَلِيفَة), 1935–1990 (assassinated). I developed an association in March, 2010. The organization’s other websites include: Proclaiming One United Religion for All People, Masjid Tucson (international headquarters), Submission.org, and God’s Mosque.
  10. I developed an association with the Spiritual Order of Faqr of Sultan-ul-Ashiqeen (ʾUr°dū, طَرِیقَتَِ سُلْطَان العَاشِقِین كَے فَقْر [MP3], Ṭaríqata–i Sulṭān ʾal-ʿĀšiqín kē Faqr) on February 19ᵗʰ, 2018. I sent my initial email on February 9ᵗʰ, 2018. It is dedicated to, and focused upon, Ḥaḍ°rat Sul°ṭān Bāhū (AS).
Admittedly, I humbly regard the hallowed Soul of that Perfect Man, Ḥaḍ°rat Sul°ṭān Bāhū (SA), whether viewed within the specific context of Sufism (Arabic, تَصَوُّف [MP3], Taṣawwuf; or صُوفِيَّة [MP3], Ṣūfiyyaẗ) or in the broader scope of Islam, the religion of peace, and Islamdom (Arabic, عَالَم الإِسْلَامِيّ [MP3], ʾālam ʾal– ⫰Is°lāmiyy, “the Islamic world”), as a Lesser Apostle. He was a pure and receptive Moon to the resplendent Star of the Prophet Muḥammad (Arabic, النَبِيّ مُحَمَّد [MP3]), ʾal–Nabiyy Muḥammad “the Prophet Muḥammad”), ṣallaỳ ʾAllꞌah ʿalay°hi wa–ssalām (Arabic, صَلَّى الله عَلَيْهِ وَسَّلَام [MP3], “blessings of ʾAllꞌah be upon Him and peace” or “SAAW”).

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⫯Uway°siyy transmissions
An ⫯Uway°siyy (Arabic, أُوَيْسِيّ [MP3]) transmission is an inner, spiritual communication, from Muḥammad (SAAW) or other divinely blessed beings, to a true believer. Unlike other supernal conveyances of grace or sanctification, neither the bestower of the blessing nor its direct recipient are in immediate physical proximity. Rather, this heavenly act of consecration occurs in the sublime realms of concealment, not in the lowly realms of disclosure. ⫯Uway°siyy transmissions may thus be considered, in a certain sense, to be miraculous. However, the mechanisms which operate in the celestial, empyrean dimensions vis–à–vis the mundane, prosaic planes should be correlated only with the greatest caution and reservation.
In ⫯Uway°siyy transmissions, permission or authorization (Arabic, إِجَازَة [MP3], ⫰iǧāzaẗ) is conveyed, in occultation (Arabic, غَيْبَة [MP3], ġaybaẗ), by an outwardly unrelated entity (living, deceased, or mythological), including the Prophet Muḥammad (SAAW), the legendary or semilegendary ʾal–H̱iḍr (الخِضِر [MP3], “the Green One),” departed šuyūẖ (شُيُوخ [MP3], “elders” or “shaykhs”), and founders of Ṣūfiyy orders (Arabic, أَئِمَّة [MP3], ⫯a⫯immaẗ, “pathfinders” or “imams”). Via otherworldly states of inspired dreams (Arabic, مَنَامَات [MP3], manāmāt) and luminous visions (Arabic, رُؤًى‏ [MP3], ru⫯waṇỳ), vows of loyalty, like the oaths of fealty once owed by knights to medieval European feudal lords, are pledged one to another.
The term ⫯Uway°siyy is named in honor of the great saint, ⫯Uway°s ʾib°n ⫯Amīr ʾib°n Har°b ʾal–Qar°niyy (Arabic, أُوَيس اِبْن أَمِير اِبْن هَرب القَرْنِيّ [MP3]). He was the first individual known to have experienced such a celestial encounter. Although ⫯Uway°s ʾal–Qar°niyy lived as Muḥammad’s (SAAW) contemporary, the two of them never had the opportunity to meet face to face. Yet, tradition has it, this venerated Yemenite (Arabic, يَمَنِيّ [MP3], Yamaniyy) was the recipient, within the world of spirits (العَالَم الأَرْوَاح [MP3], ʾal–ʿālam ʾal–arwāḥ), of a sacred transmission from the beloved Muḥammad (SAAW). Linguistically, ⫯Uway°s (Arabic, أُوَيس) translates as “wolf cub,” while ʾal–Qar°niyy (Arabic, القَرْنِيّ) is “the centenary.”
The ⫯Uway°siyy transmission of Muḥammad (Arabic, النَبِيّ مُحَمَّد [MP3]), SAAW, to Bāhū (AS) can be compared, mythopœically, to the experiences of Mōšẹh ʾẠhărōn hạ-Lēwiy bẹn Hẹʿrəšẹʿl (Hebrew/ʿIḇəriyṯ and Yiddish/Yiyḏiyš, מֹשֶׁה אַהֲרֹן בֶּן הֶערְשֶׁעל [MP3]). Following a miraculous ⫯Uway°siyy communion with Bāhū (AS), bẹn Hẹʿrəšẹʿl fictively converted from Judaism (Hebrew, הָיַהֲדוּת [MP3], Yạhăḏōṯ]) to Islam to became the founding píra ū mur°šida or pir–o–murshid (ʾUr°dūized Persian and Arabic, پِیرَ و مُرْشِدَ [MP3], “elder andguide possessingintegrity, maturity, and sensibility” of Ṭarīqaẗ ʾal–Bāhuwiyyaẗ). The Hindi version of that title is pīra aura murśida (Hindi, पीर और मुर्शिद [MP3]).
However, bẹn Hẹʿrəšẹʿl is customarily addressed as píra ū mur°šida. This ʾUr°dū honorific is a compound phrase from Persian, ʾUr°dū, and Arabic. Pír (پِیر [MP3]), a corresponding Persian word for šay°ẖ, may be translated as either “elder” or “old man.” Ū (و [MP3]) is an ʾUr°dū term for “and.” Mur°šid (مُرْشِد [MP3]), lastly, remains an Arabic designation for a guide possessingintegrity, maturity, and sensibility.” That being said, bẹn Hẹʿrəšẹʿl is a simple and modest man. Unconcerned with the frivolities of temporal salutations, he regards himself, above all, as a servant of ʾAllꞌah and all humanity (Arabic, عَبْد الله وَالبَشَرِيَّة الجَمْعَاء [MP3], ʿab°d ʾAllꞌah wa–ʾal–bašariyyaẗ ʾal–ǧam°ʿā). There is, to him, no more blessed honor.
Other appellations which, to varying degrees, possess similar connotations to píra ū mur°šida include:
  • šay°ẖ or shaykh (Arabic, شَيْخ [MP3], “elder”)
  • ⫰imām (Arabic, إِمَام [MP3], “pathfinder”)
  • hādī (Arabic, هَادِي [MP3], “guide” or “leader”)
  • maw°laỳ (Arabic, مَوْلَى [MP3], “friend”)
  • rabb (Arabic, رَبّ [MP3], “master”)
  • waliyy (Arabic, وَلِيّ [MP3], “guardian”)
  • quṭ°b (Arabic, قُطْب [MP3], “pole” or “pivot”)
  • maẖ°dūm (Arabic, مَخْدُوم [MP3], “master”)
  • čirāġ or cherag (Persian, چِرَاغ [MP3] and ʾUr°dū, چِرَاغ [MP3], “lamp”)
  • ʾus°tād (Persian, اُسْتَاد [MP3] and ʾUr°dū, اُسْتَاد [MP3], “master” or “teacher”)
  • sar°ḱār (Persian, سَرکَار [MP3] and ʾUr°dū, سَرکَار [MP3], “overseer”)
  • ẖuwāǧah (Persian, خُوَاجَه [MP3], Ṣūfiyymaster”)
  • ācārya or acharya (Sanskrit, आचार्य MP3], “moral exemplar”)
  • svāmī or swami (Sanskrit, स्वामी [MP3], “master”)
  • brahmarṣi (Sanskrit, ब्रह्मर्षि [MP3]), “transcendent seer”)
  • maharṣi or maharishi (Sanskrit, महर्षि [MP3]), “great seer”)
  • arhat (Sanskrit, अर्हत् [MP3]), “deserving one”)
  • guru (Sanskrit and Hindi, गुरु [MP3], “enlightener” or literally, “darkness–light”)
  • sadgurū or satguru (Sanskrit, सतगुरू [MP3], “true enlightener”)
  • sataguru or satguru (Hindi, सतगुरु [MP3], “true enlightener”)
  • saṯguru (Bengali/Bāṅāli/Bānlā, সৎগুরু [MP3]), “true enlightener”)
  • saṃta or sant (Hindi, संत [MP3], “truth–teller”)
  • mahaṃta or mahanta (Hindi, महंत [MP3], monasticsuperior”)
  • bla ma or lama (Tibetan/Bod Skad, བླ་མ [MP3], “high priest”)
  • oshō (Japanese, 和尚 [MP3] or オショー [MP3]), “master”)
Another example of an alleged ⫯Uway°siyy transmission from Bāhū (AS) is Ḥaḍ°rat Siýýid°nā Riýāḍ ʾAḥ°mad Sar°ḱār Guhar Šāhí or Hazrat Syedna Riaz Ahmed Sarkar Gohar Shahi (Urdū, حَضْرَة سِیُدْنَا رِیَاض احْمَد سَرْکَار گُوھَر شَاہهِی [MP3], his holy “presence, our master,” gardens ofparadise, highly prized, overseer, jewel, imperial”). Intriguingly, before I was consciously aware of beloved Bāhū, I sought out and received personal instruction in my suburban Kansas City home (Olathe, Kansas) from an initiator authorized by Guhar Šāhí (commonly, Gohar Shahi). This amiable disciple, whose name I cannot recall, represented the American Sufi Institute (P.O. Box 462, Devil’s Lake, North Dakota, U.S. 58301).
The American Sufi Institute has since been renamed as ʾal–Mar°ḱāz-i Rūḥāní Qād°rí [ʾUr°dū, المَرْکَازِ رُوحَانِی قَادْرِی [MP3], the Spiritual Center of Qād°rí] (ʾal–Qādirīyyaẗ Sufism). This group, presently located in the Jamshoro District (Urdū, ذِلَاِ جَامْشُورُو [MP3], Ḏilā-i Ǧām°šūrū) of Sindh (ʾUr°dū, سنْدْھ [MP3], Sin°d°h), Pakistan, regards Guhar Šāhí as a Sunni Muslim (Arabic, مُسْلِم السُنِّيّ [MP3], Mus°lim ʾal–Sunniyy)—not as a mih°dí (ʾUr°dū, مِہْدِی [MP3], from the Arabic, مَهْدِيّ [MP3], mah°diyy, rightlyguided one”) or messiah (Hebrew, מָשִׁיחַ [MP3], māšiyḥạ) —who welcomed people from all religions.
Guhar Šāhí taught various meditative practices, including a type of taṣavvur-i ism-i ḏāt. As I discovered much later, Šāhí, after claiming to have an inward, mystical experience with Bāhū (AS), founded a similarly ⫯Uway°siyy branch of Sār°vārí–i Qād°riýah–i Ṣūfí–i Ṭaríqat, ʾal–Qādiriyyaẗ ʾal–Mun°tahiyyaẗ [Arabic, القَادرِيَّة المُنْتَهِيَّة [MP3], the Qādirīyyaẗ of the Uttermost], and he developed a comprehensive set of teachings and methods called the Religion of God (Persian, دِينِ اِلَهِی [MP3], Dín-i ʾIlāhí; or ʾUr°dū, دِينِ اِلَہِی [MP3], Dín–i ʾIlāhí). Šāhí was, I feel, my personal gateway to Ḥaḍ°rat Sul°ṭān Bāhū (AS).
Born in 1941, and now controversially deceased (2001 or 2003), Šāhí is, I believe, my fellow traveller under Bāhū’s watchful eye:
When … Guhar Šāhí was at about the age of thirty four, at one night Ḥaḍrat Barí ʾImām [ʾUr°dū, حَضرَت بَرِی اِمَام; MP3] (tomb is in Islamabad [ʾUr°dū, اِسْلَام آبَاد, ʾIs°lām ʾÂbād, “city of Islam”; MP3]) appeared before him and said: “My son your time has come, you must go to the shrine of Sulṭān Bāhū [AS] to receive the Spiritual Knowledge.” … Guhar Šāhí then left every thing and went to shrine of Ḥaḍ°rat Sul°ṭān Bāhū [AS]. Sulṭān Bāhū [AS] appeared before him and advised to read and act upon his book Nūr ʾal–Hudaỳ ([Arabic, نُور الهُدَى; MP3] Light of Guidance) and go to Saý°h°wan Šaríf [Urdū, سَیْہْوَن‬ شَرِيف; MP3], … Dadu [ʾUr°dū, دَادُو, Dādū [MP3], Pakistan.… Guhar Šāhí read the book Nūr ʾal–Hudaỳ and went … for self-purification and peace of heart ….
… [Guhar Šāhí] then left his work, family and parents and went to Šūr°ḱuṭ [Shahmukhi Punjabi, شُورْکُوٹ; MP3], where under the blessful supervision of … Sulṭān Bāhū … [Guhar Šāhí] made the book Nūr ʾal–Hudaỳ (a book written by … Bāhū …), his journey’s companion. He then went to Sayhwan Šarīf for self-mortification and peace of heart and spent a period of three years in the mountains of Sayhwan Šarīf and the [southern Indian] forest of Lālbāg [Kannaḍa, ಲಾಲ್‌ಬಾಗ್ [MP3], “Red Garden”] in self-Purification. Thereafter pursuant to a revelation … [Guhar Šāhí] went to Ǧāmšūrū where he spent six months in a hut behind the Textbook Board Building, henceforth, with Almighty ʾAllꞌah’s will, His Holiness … [Guhar Šāhí] started to shower Almighty ʾAllꞌah’s creation with his benevolence.
Guhar Šāhí. 2009. Retrieved on September 8, 2013. Some words have been transliterated differently and spellings corrected.
I have never claimed to be Mih°dí. The false claimant is misled and ill-fated. However, I have elaborated the signs of True Mih°dí. As Holy Prophet Muḩammad (peace be upon him) has a seal of prophet at his back. Likewise on the back of Mih°dí there will be a seal of Mih°dí which will be embossed by veins and whosoever will posses this sign we will accept him as … Mih°dí.
Guhar Šāhí, A Great Spiritual Personality. October, 1999. Retrieved on September 8ᵗʰ, 2013. Some words have been transliterated differently and spellings corrected.
With profound humility, Bāhū (AS), in His lovingkindness or compassion (Pāli, मेत्ता [MP3], mettā; Sanskrit, Hindi, and Marāṭhī, मैत्री [MP3], maitrī; Nepālī, मैत्री [MP3], mitratā; Gujarātī, મિત્રતા [MP3], mitratā; Sinhalese/Siṃhala, මිත්රත්වය [MP3], mitratvaya; Thai/P̣hās̄ʹā Thịy, มิตรภาพ [MP3], mitrp̣hāph; or Khmer/Cambodian/Pheasaeakhmer, មេត្តា [MP3], mettea), remains, until the end that has no end, the collective center of our obeisance. Although I only recognized the eminent Bāhū’s (AS) personal agency back in 2011, he may have been with me, guiding me, during my entire life. For some inexplicable reason of the heart, I was drawn, above all else, to beloved Bāhū (AS) while studying Sufism.
Then on September 8ᵗʰ, 2013, during a reflection, I realized that Bāhū (AS) reached out, though Guhar Šāhí, and connected more deeply with me. Šāhí was, at the time, still, unarguably, in this world.
Click on the Image to Enlarge

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Joining Ṭarīqaẗ ʾal–Bāhuwiyyaẗ
Bis°mi ʾAllꞌah or Bismillah (Arabic, بِسْمِ الله [MP3], In the Name of ʾAllꞌah): In the Name of ʾAllꞌah, the Most Gracious, the Most Merciful! (Arabic, ﷽! [MP3], bismi ʾAllꞌah ʾal–Rrḥman ʾal–Rraḥīmi!). The major, though not to say obligatory, forms of religious expression within The Multiversal Communist Collective are the diverse traditions of Ṣūfiyy Islam (Arabic, إِسْلَام الصُوفِيّ [MP3], ⫰Is°lām ʾal–Ṣūfiyy). Should one yearn to drink from the life–giving waters or, more literally, wellspring of life (عَيْن الحَيَاة,ʿay°n ʾal–ḥayāẗ [MP3]), one may obtain membership in Ṭarīqaẗ ʾal–Bāhuwiyyaẗ of The Multiversal Communist Collective. The sincere aspirant becomes committed to engaging in the following reverential activities:
  1. Bay°ʿaẗ (Arabic, بَيْعَة [MP3]) is a sale, transaction, deal, or bargain with mabīʿāt (Arabic, مَبِيعَات [MP3]) as the plural form. Similarly, the “seller” or “salesman” would be ʾal–bā⫯iʿ (البائِع‎ [MP3]) or ʾal–bāʿaẗ (البَاعَة‎ [MP3]) when pluralized. The “saleswoman” is ʾal–bā⫯iʿaẗ (البائِعَة [MP3]) with a plural of ʾal–bā⫯iʿāt (البائِعَات [MP3]). Bayʿaẗ, an ordinary Arabic word, carries mundane connotations of mere merchandizing. In Taṣawwuf or Sufism, however, bayʿaẗ has been brilliantly reimagined. It heralds the dawn of a blissful journey toward reunion with the divine Presence. In Taṣawwuf, bayʿaẗ is a spiritual transaction. In the sense of chivalry, bayʿaẗ refers to a physical or metaphorical handshake or, more precisely, a handclasp. One pledges one’s allegiance, or homage, to a guide or elder. Thus, joining a ṭarīqaẗ is frequently described as giving bayʿaẗ. One may, in prayerful communion, offer bayʿaẗ to Ḥaḍ°rat Sul°ṭān Bāhū (AS). Having completed this ritual, one is now a dervish (originally Persian, دَرْوِیش [MP3], dar°víš; Turkish/Türk Dili, derviş [MP3], Arabic, دَرْوِيش [MP3], dar°wīš, or ʾUr°dū, دَارْوِش [MP3], dārawiša, a spiritualmendicant” or anascetic”) and a nascent Bāhuwiyy (Arabic, بَاهُوِيّ) [MP3], a disciple of Bāhū, AS). The dual form is Bāhuwayni (بَاهُوَينِ [MP3]), while the plural can be either Bāhuwiyyūna (بَاهُِيُّونَ [MP3]) or Bāhuwiyyīna (بَاهُِيِّينَ [MP3]).
  2. Focus, continually, upon visualizing or conceptualizing the performance of devotionally writing the name of ʾAllꞌah (اللّه, SWT), in Arabic, upon your own heart (Arabic, تَصَوَّرَ الاِسْم الذَات [MP3], taṣawwara ʾal–ʾis°m ʾal–ḏāt; or Perso-Arabic, تَصَوَّرِ اِسْمِ ذَات [MP3], taṣavvar–i ʾis°m–i ḏāt, “imagining the nameof ʾAllꞌah (SWT)engraveduponyour ownheart). This practice was formulated by the blessed Apostle Bāhū (AS). In some Ṣūfiyy paths or orders (Arabic, طُرُق الصُوفِيَّة [MP3], ṭuruq ʾal–Ṣūfiyyaẗ), the heart (Arabic القَلْب, ʾal–qal°b [MP3]) is a subtlety (Arabic, لُطْف [MP3], luṭ°f) and one of the six subtleties (Arabic اللَطَائِف السِتَّة [MP3], ʾal–laṭā⫯if ʾal–sittaẗ). Remarkably, the notion of ʾal–laṭā⫯if ʾal–sittaẗ bears a striking resemblance to the notion of chakras (Sanskrit, चक्र [MP3], cakra, wheel; or चक्राणि, [MP3], cakrāṇi, wheels) in other South Asian religious communities.
    ʾal–Qalb ʾal–Laṭāꞌif ʾal–Sittaẗ
  3. Practice ḏik°r (Arabic, ذِكْر [MP3]) or divine remembrance (a cognate of the Hebrew, zāḵạr, זָכַר [MP3], “remember”). In the daily ḏik°r of this ṭarīqaẗ, ḏik°r ʾal–qal°b (Arabic, ذِكْر لُطْف, “remembrance of the heart” [MP3]), the aspirant (Arabic, المُرِيد [MP3], ʾal–murīd) audibly repeats the phrase, Yā ʾAllꞌahu, wa–yā Muḥammad, wa–yā Bāhū! (Arabic, يَا اللّهُ، وَيَا مُحَمَّد، ويَا بَاهُو! [MP3]), for an extended period of time. (The English–language translation is O ʾAllꞌah, and O Muḥammad, and O Bāhū!) Stop yourself, however, before becoming exhausted. You may also inscribe the Arabic ḏik°r in your correspondance and other writing. While reciting or chanting this ḏik°r, turn in the direction (Arabic, القِبْلَة [MP3], ʾal–qib°laẗ) of Gah°ṛa Mahārāǧā (30°50′0″ north and 71°54′0″ east). The map directly below might be helpful in this regard.
    Click on the Image to Enlarge
    Ḏik°r, for those individuals unfamiliar with the practice, is similar in convention to repeating a mantra in Hinduism (Sanskrit and Hindi, हिंदू धर्म, Hiṃdū Dharma [MP3], “Indic nature,” or सनातन धर्म [MP3], Sanātana Dharma, “eternal nature”), Buddhism (Sanskrit and Hindi, बुद्ध धर्म [MP3], Buddha Dharma, “awakened nature”), and (Sanskrit and Hindi, जैन धर्म [MP3], Jaina Dharma, “victorious nature”). One of the more common Hindu mantras is Oṃ Namaḥ Śivāya (Sanskrit, ओं नमः शिवाय [MP3]), “Oṃ, I offer to the Auspicious One a respectful invocation of His Name.” A Japanese Buddhist example is Namu Myōhō Renge Kyō (Japanese/Nihongo, 南無妙法蓮華經 or なむみょうほうれんげきょう [MP3]) or Nan Myōhō Renge Kyō (Japanese, なんみょうほうれんげきょう [MP3]), “I remain devoted to the miraculous law of the Lotus Flower Sutra” (Sanskrit, सूत्र [MP3], Sūtra, “thread”). A common Tibetan Buddhist mantra, from the original Sanskrit, is Oṃ Maṇipadme Hum (Sanskrit, ॐ मणिपद्मे हुम् [MP3]), Tibetan, (ཨོཾ་མ་ཎི་པདྨེ་ཧཱུྃ, oM ma Ni pad+me hU~M [MP3]), or Vietnamese/Tiếng Việt, Úm Ma Ni Bát Ni Hồng [MP3], “Oṃ, Jewel-Lotus Wisdom” or “Oṃ, Lotus–Flower–in–Hand Wisdom.” A mantra in Jainism is, using my own translation, the genuflection mantra (Sanskrit, णमोकार मंत्र [MP3], ṇamokāra maṃtra): (Sanskrit, णमो अरिहंताणं ॥ णमो सिद्धाणं ॥ णमो आयरियाणं ॥ णमो उवज्झायाणं ॥ णमो लोए सव्व साहूणं ॥ एसोपंचणमोक्कारो । सव्वपावप्पणासणो ॥ मंगला णं च सव्वेसिं ॥ पडमम हवई मंगलं ॥ [MP3], Ṇamo arihaṃtāṇaṃ. Ṇamo siddhāṇaṃ. Ṇamo āyariyāṇaṃ. Ṇamo uvajjhāyāṇaṃ. Ṇamo loe savva sāhūṇaṃ. Esopaṃcaṇamokkāro, savvapāvappaṇāsaṇo. Maṃgalā ṇaṃ ca savvesiṃ. Paḍamama havaī maṃgalaṃ.), “I bow to the conquerers. I bow to the accomplished ones. I bow to the preceptors. I bow to the monks. I bow to all the sages of the world. This five–fold salutation completely destroys all sins. Of all auspicious mantras, [it] is indeed the most auspicious one.”
  4. As a member of a Marxist–Luxemburgist (MP3) communist ṭarīqaẗ, dedicate yourself, in a lifestyle of divine servitude (Arabic, عُبُودِيَّة [MP3], ʿubūdiyyaẗ), to fighting capitalism, fascism, imperialism, injustice, racism, sexism, sectarianism, and all forms of oppression in the capitalist world–system. Like the Marxist heroine Rosa Luxemburg (German/Deutsch; MP3), Róża Luksemburg (Polish/Polski; MP3), or “Red Rosa🌹 (German, rote Rosa [MP3]); 1871–1919), work heartily for democratic revolutionary communism. Defend the masses, especially the victims of neofascism, in the Autonomist Antifa Movement (MP3). Bāhū (AS) Himself, while living centuries before the inception of Marxism, was committed to ending sectarian divisions in Islam. Upon rejecting disunity or dualism for unity or nonduality, the dialectical contradictions in His life were absented. He was emancipated through copresence or solidarity:
Neither Sunniyy [Arabic سُنِّيّ [MP3]] nor Šīʿiyy [Arabic شِيعِيّ [MP3]] am I.
Heartburn doth afflict me with one as with the other.
The moment I cast them aside, my pathway was arid no longer. I found myself immersed in the ocean of divine Unity.
Many souls, poorly prepared for that which awaited them, dived into the ocean and drowned. Few swam successfully to the journey’s end.
Only those who held steadfastly to the Master’s hand reached the heavenly shore in safety.
〜 Ḥaḍ°rat Sul°ṭān Bāhū, Kalām-i Bāhū (Perso–Arabic, کَلَامِ بَاهُو [MP3], Discourse of Bāhū). Translation significantly modified by Mark A. Foster (Mōšẹh ʾẠhărōn hạ-Lēwiy bẹn Hẹʿrəšẹl).
Furthermore, Bāhū (AS) has made these promises to His beloveds:
O seeker! Thou hast requested permission [Arabic, إِجَازَة, ⫰iǧāzaẗ] for mystical knowledge [Arabic, مَعْرِفَة [MP3], maʿ°rifaẗ] from me ….
I will show thee ʾAllꞌah as nearer to thee than thy jugular [or life] vein [Persian, šāh°rag شَاهْرَگ [MP3], king vein].
〜 Ḥaḍ°rat Sul°ṭān Bāhū, Kalām-i Bāhū. Translation significantly modified by Mark A. Foster (Mōšẹh ʾẠhărōn hạ-Lēwiy bẹn Hẹʿrəšẹl).
Whoso shalt study this book, by day and by night, with sincerity, certitude, and conviction will become cognizant of the divine [Arabic, إِلهِيّ [MP3], ⫰ilhiyy] secrets. He hath no need of instruction [Arabic, تَلْقِين [MP3], tal°qīn] and teaching [Arabic, تَعْلِيم [MP3], taʿ°līm] from a living guide [Arabic, مُرْشِد [MP3], mur°šid].
〜 Ḥaḍ°rat Sul°ṭān Bāhū, Kalām-i Bāhū. Translation significantly modified by Mark A. Foster (Mōšẹh ʾẠhărōn hạ-Lēwiy bẹn Hẹʿrəšẹl).
Morality is emancipatory. In a theology of liberation, the Apostles were revolutionaries, not reactionaries. Sadly, some social conservatives have have duped the U.S. public. Presumably to win elections, they equate morality with traditionalism, while the opposite is true. Was Jesus (Hebrew, יֵשׁוּעַ [MP3], Yēšūʿạ), AS, in challenging polytheism, a conservative? Muḥammad’s (SAAW) followers, clearly not pacifists in the face of injustice, engaged in a revolutionary defense of their community. When Moses (Hebrew, מֹשֶׁה [MP3], Mōšẹh; AS) and His disciples were persecuted in Egypt, they trusted in ʾAllꞌah (SWT) and traversed the wildernesss. Ḥaḍ°rat Sul°ṭān Bāhū (AS), for His part, challenged both major branches of Islam.

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Other Bhakti–Ṣūfiyy Adventures
There have been additional expressions of the Bhakti–Ṣūfiyy movement, and its subsequent offshoots, to which I was drawn at various points of my life. For instance, at 12 years old (1968), I nearly joined Sikhism (Guramukhi Punjabi, ਸਿੱਖ ਧਰਮ [MP3], Sikha Dharama, “disciple’s nature”), a progeny of that movement, which was founded by Gurū Nānaka (Guramukhi Punjabi, ਗੁਰੂ ਨਾਨਕ [MP3]), 1469–1539. Sikhism’s strong monotheism coupled with its doctrine of reincarnation were particularly attractive to me. However, through snail mail correspondence, that same year, with the Sikh Temple in Stockton, California, I was dissuaded by the five Ks (Guramukhi Punjabi, ਪੰਜ ਕਕਾਰ [MP3], paja kakāra) for baptised Sikhs.
Reluctantly, I acknowledged that Sikhism, however much I loved it, was rooted in an earlier time and a far different locale. The religion’s mode of dress and hair style was never intended for the student locker room of a 1960s American gymnasium. Attiring myself with such unconventional accoutrements, displayed in the two pictures below left, made no more sense than wearing the medieval European apparel of a traditional Hasidic Jew (Hebrew/ʿIḇəriyṯ, יְהוּדִי הַחָסִיד [MP3], Yəhūḏiy hạ–Ḥāsiyḏ), as depicted below right. Being thus adorned, with the trappings of one faith or the other, would have placed a target on my back. I cannot imagine the reception by my seventh–grade classmates, especially the school’s bullies.
Sikh man Sikh man Hasidic men
Nevertheless, my interest in Sikhism was undeterred. That affinity has, in fact, continued to the present day. Totally unaware of the historical connection with Sikhism at the time, I was attracted, in approximately 1970, to the religion of Eckankar (Guramukhi Punjabi, ਇੱਕ ਓਅੰਕਾਰ, Ika Ōꞌakāra [MP3], “One Oṃ–Makeror One God, symbolized as ੴ)―a thoroughly Americanized branch of a heterodox, extrasensory outgrowth from Sikhism and, hence, the Bhakti–Ṣūfiyy movement. Eckandar was founded, in 1965, by John “Paul” Twitchell (1909–1971). Oṃ (Sanskrit, ओं [MP3]) and the more common Buddhist spelling auṃ (Sanskrit, औं [MP3]) are both symbolized by the Sanskrit glyph ॐ.
Oṃ or auṃ, as chanted in this MP3 audio file, has no particular or known definition. However, the syllable has sometimes been regarded as the primordial sound of existence, as the original vibration which set the universe in motion, or, in comparison to conventional doctrines in numerous branches of Christianity, as a poignant expression of the creative Word (Ancient Greek/A̓rchaía Hellēniká, Λόγος [MP3], Lógos) of God. Commonly referred to as the praṇava mantra (Sanskrit, प्रणव मन्त्र [MP3], “powerful mantra”), oṃ or auṃ remains a sacred sound in a variety of respectable South Asian spiritual and faith traditions.
Quite similarly, the pronunciation of YHWH or YHVH (Hebrew, יהוה‎) is frequently approximated as Yahweh or Yahveh (Hebrew, יָהְוֶה [MP3], Yāhəwẹh). These letters, spelled in any fashion, are considered so profoundly sacred by some religious Jews that giving them voice is prohibited. YHWH, known as the Tetragrámmaton (Ancient Greek, Τετραγράμματον [MP3], literally, “four letters”), may offer a useful analogue to oṃ or auṃ. Based upon the reflections of the Franciscan Roman Catholic priest, Father Richard Rohr (born in 1943), YHWH literally cannot be voiced. The word, to him, is not a word. Instead, the Yahweh Prayer (MP3), as Rohr calls it, represents the sound of a full breath (yah … weh):
I cannot emphasize enough the momentous importance of the Jewish revelation of the name of God. It puts the entire nature of our spirituality in correct context and, if it had been followed, could have freed us from much idolatry and arrogance. As we now spell and pronounce it, the word is Yahweh.… It [YHVH] was considered a literally unspeakable word for Jews, and any attempt to know what we were talking about was “in vain,” as the commandment said (Exodus 20:7). Instead, they used Elohim [Hebrew, אֱלֹהִים [MP3], ʾĔlōhiym, “Almighty”] or Adonai [Hebrew, אֲדֹנָי [MP3], ʾĂḏōnāy, “Lord”] in speaking or writing. From God’s side the divine identity was kept mysterious and unavailable to the mind; when Moses asked for the divinity’s name, he got only the phrase that translates something to this effect: “I AM WHO AM.… This is my name forever; this is my title for all generations” (Exodus 3:14–15).
This unspeakability has long been recognized, but we now know it goes even deeper: formally the word was not spoken at all, but breathed! Many are convinced that its correct pronunciation is an attempt to replicate and imitate the very sound of inhalation and exhalation. The one thing we do every moment of our lives is therefore to speak the name of God. This makes it our first and our last word as we enter and leave the world.
Richard Rohr. The Naked Now: Learning to See as the Mystics See. New York: A Crossroad Book imprint of The Crossroad Publishing Company. 2009. Pages 25–26.
Twitchell brazenly lied when denying prior involvement with his parent tradition, Radha Soami Satsang (Hindi, राधा स्वामी सत्संग [MP3], Rādhā Svāmī Satsaṃga, “true associationbythe possessor of prosperity”), and its clairvoyant and clairaudient meditation, Surat Shabd Yoga (Hindi, सूरत शब्द योग [MP3], Sūrata Śabda Yōga, “union through attention to the word”). He became an adept of Kirpal Singh (Guramukhi Punjabi, ਕਿਰਪਾਲ ਸਿੰਘ [MP3], Kirapāla Sigha), 1894–1974, and his Ruhani Satsang (Hindi, रूहानी सत्संग [MP3], Rūhānī Satsaṃga, “spiritual true association”) in 1955. The latter, in fact, was a schism of yet another schism, Radha Soami Satsang Beas (Hindi, राधा स्वामी सत्संग ब्यास [MP3], Rādhā Svāmī Satsaṃga Byāsa).
Eventually, a photograph featuring Twitchell with Singh torpedoed the scam. A considerable number of Eckists, as they are called, dolefully abandoned the organization. Heartbroken, many felt, legitimately it seems to me, as though Twitchell had duped, even swindled, them. In my own case, I recall that only a minor postal miscommunication between me, at around thirteen-years old, and the movement’s Las Vegas headquarters (subsequently in Menlo Park, California, and presently in Chanhassen, Minnesota) prevented me from membership. Their returned letter could have dampened my enthusiasm, but I had already lost interest. Yet, my attraction to Surat Shabd Yoga resumed in earnest several years later.
Kirpal Singh (middle) and Paul Twitchell (far right)
I was, therefore, ultimately initiated into three other factions of the contemplative Surat Shabd Yoga:
  1. Sree Sree Thakur Anukulchandra Satsang (Bengali শ্রী শ্রী ঠাকুর অনুকূলচন্দ্র সৎসঙ্গ [MP3], Śrīśrīṭhākura Anukūlacandra Saṯsaṅga) is a peculiarly Indocentric Radhasoami tradition. Anukulchandra (1888–1969) supported the Indian caste system. I was initiated by one of his disciples, Ray Archer Hauserman, in his Glen Cove, Long Island, New York, home.
  2. Sant Mat (Hindi, संत मत [MP3], Saṃta Mata, “truth–teller’s teaching”) was founded by Thakur Singh (Hindi, ठाकुर सिंह [MP3], Ṭhākura Siṃha), 1929–2005, one of Kirpal Singh’s several successors. Thakur Singh, under whose authority I was initiated, was, in turn, replaced by Baljit Singh (Hindi, बलजीत सिंह [MP3], Balajīta Siṃha), born in 1962.
  3. Spiritual Freedom Satsang, founded by Michael Turner (born in 1958), is a small organization whose current status is unknown. It is also a part of the Radhasoami Satsang Beas tradition. Specifically, Turner, who personally initiated me over the phone, hails from the offshoot of Eckankar, ATOM: Ancient Teachings of the Masters. That group, now essentially a publishing house, was founded by the late Darwin Gross (1928–2008), a former master in Eckankar who was controversially forced out of the organization.
Due to the primarily inner transmissions of successorship, this neo–Sikh movement has repeatedly divided. It began, however, with Agrah (Hindi, आग्रह [MP3], Āgraha), India’s Shri Shiv Dayal Singh Sahab (Hindi, श्री शिव दयाल सिंह साहब [MP3], Śrī Śiva Dayāla Siṃha Sāhaba). He was, occupationally, a banker and known among his followers by the reverential title of Soamiji Maharaj (Hindi, स्वामी जी महाराज [MP3], Svāmī Jī Mahārāja, “respectful and sovereign master”), 1818–1878.
The mantras recited by devotees vary, sometimes considerably, between the multiple traditions of Radha Soami Satsang. Nevertheless, in Radha Soami Satsang Beas and in many of its branches, the Surat Shabd Yoga tradition with which I am most familiar, five names (Sanskrit, पङ्च नमः, paṅca namaḥ) are conventionally used. Eckankar is one well–known exception. In that organization, adherents are instructed to chant Hu (MP3), a word which may be related to Huwa (Arabic, هُوَ, “He,” frequently a reference to ʾAllꞌah).
Three final preliminary points:
  1. Out of a respect for current meditators, and a sincere desire not to unduly offend them, I shall note that, although the five names are provided confidentially in some groups of the Radhasoami Satsang Beas tradition along with an explicit request not to divulge them to others, that practice of surreptitiousness is not universal.
  2. In the Quan Yin Method (Chinese, 观音法 [MP3], Guān–Yīn–Fǎ, “Way of Witnessing Sound”) of Ching Hai (Chinese, 驚駭 [MP3], Jīng Hài, “astonished one”), born in 1950, the Paṅca Namaḥ have been modified, or perhaps unintentionally distorted, as: Gomtrazan Gwaarla Rarunka Sohuan Satnum. Ching Hai was, like myself, an initiate of Thakur Singh. Yet, to my knowledge, Ching Hai, as with Twitchell before her, has never publicly acknowledged her connection with the Radhasoami Satsang Beas tradition.
  3. The precise spellings of the Paṅca Namaḥ provided here, and the translations of those words, are based upon my own original research.
With those qualifications out of the way, Surat Shabd Yoga consists of two parts. First, the ears are plugged, and the sound current, supposedly intensifying in frequency as one progresses, is listened to from the right side. Second, the eyes are shut, while utilizing the prescribed regimen of mantras, permitting the meditator to allegedly witness visions of progressively higher planes and the beings residing within them (including, ultimately, one’s spiritual master). The following simaraṇa (Hindi, सिमरण [MP3], “remembrance”) constitutes the most widely taught five–part mantra as presented verbally by the initiator and then silently or inwardly repeated by disciples within the Radha Soami Satsang Beas tradition:
  1. Jyōta Nirañjana (Sanskrit, ज्योत निरंजन [MP3]), “Flawless Light
  2. Oṃkāra (Sanskrit, ओंकार [MP3]), “Oṃ–Maker
  3. Raraṃkāra (Sanskrit, ररंकार [MP3]), “Reciting the Name of the Dark One,” i.e., Rāma (Sanskrit, राम [MP3])
  4. Sohaṃga (Sanskrit, सोहंग [MP3]), “I am He (or That)
  5. Satanāma (Sanskrit, सतनाम [MP3]), “True (or Ideal) Name
By contrast, initiates of certain other Surat Shabd Yoga traditions simply recite “Radhasoami” (Hindi, राधास्वामी [MP3], Rādhāsvāmī, “possessor of prosperity”). In Shabd Pratap Ashram (Sanskrit, शब्द प्रताप आश्रम [MP3], Śabda Pratāpa Āśrama, “Word of Power Monastery”), another Surat Shabd Yoga tradition, devotees are instructed to deliver this three–part simaraṇa:
  1. Dharā (Sanskrit, धरा [MP3], “Support” or, commonly, “Waterfall”)
  2. Sindhu (Sanskrit, सिन्धु [MP3], “Ocean,” “Stream,” “Flood,” “Waters,” “Sea,” or “Indus River”)
  3. Pratāpa (Sanskrit, प्रताप [MP3], “Heat,” “Warmth,” “Splendor,” “Glory,” “Majesty,” “Power,” “Strength,” or “Energy”)
Moving to another subject, a secondary Bhakti–Ṣūfiyy attraction, to me, was established by Chaitanya Mahaprabhu (Sanskrit, चैतन्य महाप्रभु [MP3], Caitanya Mahāprabhu), 1486–1584, i.e., Gaudiya Vaishnavism (Sanskrit, गौड़ीय वैष्णव, [MP3], Gauṛīya Vaiṣṇava]) and its philosophy of Achintya Bheda Abheda (Sanskrit, अचिन्त्यभेदाभेद [MP3], Acintyabhedābheda, “inconceivable difference and oneness”). Duality and nonduality are harmonized. Gaudiya lies in South Asia’s Bengal (Bengali, বঙ্গ [MP3], Baṅga) region. Vaiṣṇava focuses upon Vishnu (Sanskrit, विष्णु [MP3], Viṣṇu, “All–Pervasive”) worship, but Krishna (Sanskrit, कृष्ण [MP3], Kṛṣṇa, “Dark”), whose dates of birth and death remain disputed, is often included.
Gaudiya Vaishnavism is widely, but not uniquely, linked to the International Society for Krishna Consciousness (ISKCON). The well–known mantra of ISKCON—referred to by devotees within the original organization and its several splinter groups as the mahāmantra (Sanskrit, mahāmantra, महामन्त्र [MP3] “great mantra”)—is as follows: Hare [Power or Potency] Krṣṇa [Black], Hare Krṣṇa, Krṣṇa Krṣṇa, Hare Hare; Hare Rāma [Dark], Hare Rāma, Rāma Rāma, Hare Hare (Sanskrit, हरे कृष्ण । हरे कृष्ण । कृष्ण कृष्ण । हरे हरे ॥ हरे राम । हरे राम । राम राम । हरे हरे [MP3], “power to Krishna, power to Krishna, Krishna Krishna, Power Power; Power to Rama, Power to Rama, Rama Rama, Power Power.”
Glory to the Śrī–Kṛṣṇā–saṅkīrtana [Sanskrit, श्री–कृष्ण–संकीर्तन [MP3], “Radiant Krishna chanting”], which cleanses the heart of all the dust accumulated for years and extinguishes the fire of conditional life, of repeated birth and death. This saṅkīrtana [Sanskrit, संकीर्तन, “chanting”] movement is the prime benediction for humanity at large because it spreads the rays of the benediction moon. It is the life of all transcendental knowledge. It increases the ocean of transcendental bliss, and it enables us to fully taste the nectar for which we are always anxious.
O my Lord, They holy name alone can render all benediction to living beings, and thus Thou has hundreds and millions of names, like Kṛṣṇā and Goviṃdā [Sanskrit, गोविंदा [MP3], “protector of cows”]. In these transcendental names Thou hast invested all Thine transcendental energies. There are not even hard and fast rules for chanting these names. O my Lord, out of kindness Thou does enable us to easily approach The by Thine holy names, but I am so unfortunate that I have no attraction for them.
One should chant the holy name of the Lord in a humble state of mind, thinking oneself lower than the straw in the street; one should be more tolerant than a tree, devoid of all sense of false prestige, and should be ready to offer all respect to others. In such a state of mind one can chant the holy name of the Lord constantly.
O Almighty Lord, I have no desire to accumulate wealth, nor do I desire beautiful women, nor do I want any number of followers. I only want Thy causeless devotional service, birth after birth.
O Son of Mahārāja Naṃdā [Sanskrit, महाराज नंदा [MP3], “Great or Exalted King of Joy,” i.e., Kṛṣṇā’s custodial or “foster” father], I am They eternal servitor, yet somehow or other I have fallen into the ocean of birth and death. Please pick me up from this ocean of death and place me as one of the atoms at They lotus feet.
O my Lord, when will my eyes be decorated with tears of love flowing constantly when I chant They holy name? When will my voice choke up, and when will the hairs of my body stand on end at the recitation of They name?
O Goviṃdā! Feeling Thy separation, I am considering a moment to be like twelve or more years. Tears are flowing from my eyes like torrents of rain, and I am feeling thoroughly vacant in the world in They absence.
I know no one but Kṛṣṇā as my Lord, and He shall remain so even if He handles me roughly by His embrace or makes me brokenhearted by not being present before me. He is completely free to do anything and everything, for He is always my worshipful Lord, unconditionally.
Caitanya Mahāprabhu, Śrī Śikṣāṣṭakama (Sanskrit, श्री शिक्षाष्टकम [MP3], “Radiant Knowledge”). A complete translation of the only known text by Caitanya.

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The Preternatural Multiverse
Now, in the 21ˢᵗ century, a speculative narrative on many worlds theory (radio show; MP3), among quantum physics’ theories of everything, takes communism or revolutionary socialism into the omniverse. The transformative praxis (practice), as utilized by the syncretistic if apocryphal Ṭarīqaẗ ʾal–Bāhuwiyyaẗ of The Multiversal Communist Collective, can be summarized as the meditative cultivation of a transdimensional communism with beings in other metaphysical universes. The figurative “vehicles” for contact and communication with a myriad of omniversal creatures—residing within both ourselves and this world—are the phenomenological analyses (MP3) of Heartfuless Inquiry™ or The Echoing Practice™.
Ssalāmu ʿalay°kum! (Arabic, سَّلَامُ عَلَيْكُم! [MP3], “peace be upon you!”) Before beginning this brief presentation, I feel inspired to offer earnest and heartfelt apologies for any possible mispronunciations, on my part, throughout the entire essay. My weaknesses, in this area and others, are acutely abundant. Nevertheless, I will, as best I can, attempt to set them aside and proceed to the subject at hand. Similar views to the ones presented in the following diagram have been considered more or less cogently within The Institute for Dialectical metaRealism™, The Unicentric Paradigm™, and Echoes of Cosmic Unity™:
  1. UNIVERSE OF TAW°ḤĪD: This Collective Center of Taw°ḥīd–Täwahədo–Tawəhidə–Yiḥūḏ—the innermost universe of universes for all the beings and things in existence—is inhabited by the Cosmic Unity of ʾAllꞌah–ʾÄlahə–ʾAlāhā–ʾĔlōhiym. Additionally, those quadruplicate sets of words are pairs of Semitic cognates. Taw°ḥīd (Arabic, تَوْحِيد [MP3]), Täwahədo (Geʾez/Gəʾəzə, ተዋህዶ [MP3]), Tawəhidə (Amharic/ʾÄmarəña, ታውሂድ [MP3]), and Yiḥūḏ (Hebrew, יִחוּד [MP3]) refer to “Unification.” On the other hand, ʾAllꞌah (SWT), ʾÄlahə (Amharic, አላህ [MP3]), ʾAlāhā (Syriac/Suryāyā, (ܐܲܠܵܗܵܐ [MP3]), and ʾĔlōhiym (Hebrew, אֱלֹהִ֔י [MP3]) are designations for “God.” Like rolling a ball of yarn, not peeling back the layers of an onion, these successive universes spiral out from the Collective Center.


  2. UNIVERSE OF TAḤARRUR: The term Taḥarrur (Arabic, تَحَرُّر [MP3]) refers to “emancipation” or “liberation.” In Sanskrit and Hindi, mokṣa or moksha (मोक्ष [MP3]) brings into its orbit various forms of “emancipation.” Extending out from this hidden, unknowable universe, its exterior universes will be enumerated in the following categories.
    1. UNIVERSE OF RUSUL: These sanctified Rusul (Arabic, رُسُل [MP3], “Apostles”), residing in this universe, are omniscient and omnipotent Beings. A Rasūl (Arabic, رَسُول [MP3]), on the other hand, is a single “Apostle.” Greater and Lesser Apostles are Emissaries of the UNIVERSE OF TAW°ḤĪD. Their eloquent discourses are addressed to mortal and everlasting souls. In Sanskrit and Hindi, Avatārāḥ (Sanskrit and Hindi, अवताराः [MP3]) are “Descending Ones.” The singular form is Avatāra (Sanskrit and Hindi, अवतार [MP3], “Descending One”).
      1. Universe of Maẓ°rūf ʾal-Kaw°niyy: The Rusul abide together, living as Many in One, within a great Maẓ°rūf ʾal-Kaw°niyy (Arabic, مَظْرُوف الكَوْنِيّ [MP3]), a Cosmic Envelope. The Cosmic Envelope of divine Unity is a celestial kūn°fid°rāliyyaẗ (Arabic, كُونْفِدرَالِيَّة [MP3]), an Indo–European loanword for a “confederation.” Also relevant is the term anekāntavāda (Sanskrit and Hindi, अनेकान्तवाद [MP3])―a concept in Jainism for many–sidednesss.
      2. Universe of Nis°biyyaẗ: Each Apostle has a unique relative reality. Nis°biyyaẗ (نِسْبِيَّة [MP3]] is “relativity.” Āpekṣikatva (Sanskrit and Hindi, आपेक्षिकत्व [MP3]) is also “relativity.”
    2. UNIVERSE OF ⫯AR°Ḍ ʾAL–ṢIR°FAT̈: ⫯Ar°ḍ ʾal–Ṣir°faẗ (Arabic, أَرْض الصِرْفَة [MP3], “Pure Land”), Jìngtǔ (Chinese/Zhōngwén, 淨土 [MP3], “Pure Land”), Jōdo (Japanese, 浄土 [MP3], “Pure Land”), Chŏngt’o (Korean/Han’gugŏ/Chosŏnmal, 정토 [MP3], “Pure Land”), Tịnh Độ (Vietnamese/Tiếng Việt [MP3], “Pure Land”), Din Dæn Bris̄uthṭhi̒ (Thai/P̣hās̄ʹā Thịy, ดินแดนบริสุทธิ์ [MP3], “Pure Land”), Dei Sot (Khmer/Pheasaeakhmer/Khemorphasa, ដីសុទ្ធ [MP3], “Pure Land”), Thidin Bolisud (Lao/Law, ທີ່ດິນບໍລິສຸດ [MP3], “Pure Land”), Śuddha Jamīna (Hindi and Marāṭhī, शुद्ध जमीन [MP3], “Pure Land”), Śuddha Bhūmi (Nepālī, शुद्ध भूमि [MP3], “Pure Land”), Biśudꞌdha Bhūmi (Bengali, বিশুদ্ধ ভূমি [MP3], “Pure Land”), Tanah Murni (Malay/Bahasa Malaysia [MP3], “Pure Land”), or ʾẸrẹṣ hạ–Ṯāhōr (Hebrew, אֶרֶץ הַטָהוֹר [MP3], “Pure Land”), is the true and eternal universe of the bodhisattvāḥ (Sanskrit, बोधिसत्त्वाः [MP3], “awakening essences”). Each bodhisattva (Sanskrit, बोधिसत्त्व [MP3], “awakening essence”) devotes her or his everlasting life to the service of others. All departed souls now dwell, for all eternity, in various strings of this universe.
      1. Universe of Dirāyaẗ: The world of dirāyaẗ (Arabic, دِرَايَة [MP3]), “knowledge,” possessed by the bodhisattvāḥ comes, progressively, from the Rusul Themselves. In Sanskrit and Hindi, vidyā (विद्या [MP3]), from the same Indo–European root as “wisdom” and “wise,” is “knowledge.”
      2. Universe of Raḥ°maẗ: Raḥ°maẗ (Arabic, رَحْمَة [MP3]), “compassion,” is the ṭarīqaẗ (Arabic, طَرِيقَة [MP3], rās°tah (ʾUr°dū, رَاسْتَہ [MP3]), “path”), dẹrẹḵə (Hebrew, דֶּרֶךְ [MP3], “path”), duka (Amharic, ዱካ [MP3], “path”), pathi (Sanskrit, पथि [MP3], “path”), patha (Bengali, পথ [MP3], “path”), dào or tao (Chinese, 道 [MP3], “path”), dao (Lingwa de Planeta/Lidepla/LdP [MP3], “path”), vojo (Esperanto [MP3], “path”), voyo (Ido [MP3], “path”), sentiero (Interlingua [MP3], “path”), luveg (Volapük [MP3], “path”), weth (Láadan [MP3], “path”), стежка in Cyrillic or stežka in Roman (Interslavic [MP3], “path”), paund (Sambahsa [MP3], “path”), or pluta (Lojban [MP3], “path”) of universal maturity for all bodhisattvāḥ.
      3. Universe of ʾÂẖiraẗ: In this universe of the great beyond, the intended result of our moral lives in the Universe of Ṭabīʿaẗ (Arabic, طَبِيعَة [MP3], “nature”) is revealed to be personal and social emancipation as completed bodhisattvāḥ. ʾÂẖiraẗ (Arabic, آخِرَة [MP3]) is the “Hereafter.” In Hebrew, Šāmạyim (שָׁמַיִם [MP3]) is “Heaven”)
    3. Universe of Ṭabīʿaẗ
    4. UNIVERSE OF ⫯AḤ°LĀM: The dream state and the Guardian Angels (Arabic, المَلَائِكَة الحَارِسَة [MP3], ʾal–Malā⫯ikaẗ ʾal–Ḥārisaẗ) Who inhabit that universe can be powerful agents for self-discovery. One came to me in a dream, bumped into my bed, and said, “Uh, oh.” I thought I was dreaming. However, when I got up, my keys were missing from the push pin in my wall. At my assistant resident manager’s urging, I filed a police report. The officer, named “Stephen” as I recall, took photographs of my apartment. When I woke up the following morning, the keys were returned. I obviously cancelled the police report. However, I was also transformed from an unempathetic Autist into an empathic, loving human being. ⫯Aḥ°lām (Arabic, أَحْلَام [MP3]) are “dreams.”
    5. UNIVERSE OF FAḌĀ⫯IL: Through the Rusul, each of us can, while living in this universe, become a virtuous bodhisattva. Faḍā⫯il (Arabic, فَضَائِل [MP3]) are “virtues.”

  3. UNIVERSE OF NĀSŪT: Nāsūt (Arabic, نَاسُوت [MP3], “humanity”), which occupies the relatively limited universe of human beings, contains rational (such as thinking and free will), sensory, growing, and cohesive characteristics. This universe is interplanetary, interstellar, intergalactic, and perhaps interdimensional.
    1. UNIVERSE OF TAWĀǦUD ʾAL–MUŠ°TARAK: Groups, layered within this universe, unite around one or more Rusul. Tawāǧud ʾal–Muš°tarak (Arabic, تَوَاجُد المُشْتَرَك [MP3], “joint presence” or “common presence”), is “copresence.” In Sanskrit and Hindi, ekatā (एकता [MP3]) is “unity” or “copresence.”
    2. UNIVERSE OF WAH°M: The negation or contradiction of copresence divides people from one another. Wah°m (Arabic, وَهْم [MP3]) is delusion or imagination. In Sanskrit and Hindi, māyā (Sanskrit and Hindi, माया [MP3]) is “illusion”, “dualism,” or “demireality.”
    3. UNIVERSE OF MĀDDIYYAT̈: Human bodies, in the physical universe, include the characteristics of animals, vegetables, and minerals. Māddiyyaẗ (Arabic, مَادِّيَّة [MP3]) is “materiality.”

  4. UNIVERSE OF ⫰IḤ°SĀS: Each animal in this universe contains sensory, growing, and cohesive characteristics. They are the animal’s bodily functions (shared by human beings). ⫰Iḥ°sās (Arabic, إِحْسَاس [MP3]) is “sensation.” In Sanskrit, vedanā (वेदना [MP3]) is “sensation” or “feeling.”

  5. UNIVERSE OF NUMUWUṆ: Each vegetable occupying this universe of germination contains growing and cohesive characteristics. Numuwuṇ (Arabic, نُمُوٌّ [MP3]) is “growth.”

  6. UNIVERSE OF TARĀBUṬ: Each mineral within this universe of elemental connectedness contains cohesive characteristics. Tarābuṭ (Arabic, تَرَابُط [MP3]) is “cohesion.” Likewise, in Sanskrit and Hindi, saṃsakti (संसक्ति [MP3]) is “cohesion.”

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A Few Concluding Comments
The majestic national anthem of ʾal–ǧamāʿiyyaẗ (Arabic, الجَمَاعِيَّة [MP3], “the collective”) and its ṭarīqaẗ is beautifully and stirringly vocalized by Muhammad Iqbal Bahu (ʾUr°dū, مُحَمَّدَ اِقْبَالَ بَاهُو [MP3], Muḥammada ʾIq°bāla Bāhū):
Bāhuwiyyaẗ (Arabic, بَاهُوِيَّة [MP3]) Musical Notes
The state bird of Punjab, India, a species of large hawk, is called the baaz (Hindi, बाज़ [MP3], bāza) also known as the Northern Goshawk (Guramukhi Punjabi, ਉੱਤਰੀ ਗੋਸ਼ਾਕ [MP3], Utarī Gōśāka; or Shahmukhi Punjabi, اُتَرِی گُوشَاکَ [MP3], ʾUtarí Gūšāḱa). The state animal is the blackbuck (Hindi, कृष्णमृग [MP3], krṣṇamrga). However, the provincial bird of Bāhū’s (AS) region of Punjab, in modern Pakistan, is the peacock (ʾUr°dū, مُورَ [MP3], mūra). The provincial animal is the urial, also known as the arkars or the shapo (ʾUr°dū, پُنْجَابِی اُڑِیَالَ [MP3], Pun°ǧābí ʾuṛiýāla, “Punjabi urial”), a subspecies of wild sheep. The urial has been formally proclaimed as the collective’s official animal:
Urial
The rupee ([MP3] originally Persian, رُوپِیِه [MP3], rūpiýih; ʾUr°dū, رُوپِیَہ [MP3], rūpiýah; Hindi, रुपीया [MP3], rupīyā; Arabic, رُوبِيَّة [MP3], rūbiyyaẗ; Guramukhi Punjabi, ਰੁਪਏ [MP3], rupaꞌē; Shahmukhi Punjabi, رُپَأَے [MP3], rupa⫯ē; Sind°h, رُوپِيَا [MP3], rūpiyā; Pashto/Paṣ̌°tū, رُوپۍ [MP3], rupəi; or Hebrew, רוּפִּי [MP3], rūpiy, “silver”) is the collective’s medium of exchange. This legal tender, which has remained the official monetary standard in India to this day, first became the regional currency for much of South Asia, including the Punjab, in the 16ᵗʰ century. These side–by–side photographs illustrate some of the first rupees coined in that century:
silver rupee coin made during the reign of the Mughal Emperor Alamgir II rupee from 1540–1545 A.D.
I am a libertarian communist on the 8values Political Quiz (January 11ᵗʰ, 2018) and a left libertarian using the Political Compass Text (February 3ʳᵈ, 2018). Both of these tests are popular among members of NationStates. In the academic literature, Rosa Luxemburg, as a proto–left communist, is frequently referred to as a libertarian Marxist. The term has various definitions. One is the absolute rejection of a state. Another is an opposition to authoritarian forms of governance. Rosa supported a democratic proletarian state. However, on a authoritarianism–to–libertarianism scale, she is a libertarian. Other online tests describe me as a Luxemburgist, a left communist, a libertarian Marxist, a Trotskyist, and even a communitarian.

Populism, whether on the left or the neofascist right, is highly dangerous. Left–wing populism, as an opponent of critical theory, is hostile toward political correctness, African American socialist intersectionality, Black Lives Matter, and Antifa (even as tactics, not strategies). Critical thinking and the long–term success of legitimate left revolutionary movements are threatened. Moreover, such anti–intellectual, faux left populism thrives on categorical—either–or and good–bad—statements. All critical theorists should be aware of the cancerous growth of leftist populism in certain dark recesses of the Internet and be willing to confront it. This phenomenon may be the most dangerous current to ambush the Left since McCarthyism.
Communists can never be too fanatical about justice. Yet, many left–wing populists, parotting a meme, disparage others as social justice warriors (SJWs for short). What is the point of being a Leftist if one does not fight social injustice? Certainly, there are plenty of other activities in which one could become engaged. Hobbies are abundant. One can shop, text, surf the web, or chat on the phone. Battling particular injustices also does not preclude one from working, more specifically, for communism. One can then enroll in courses, or read books, on time management. Ultimately, how much one chooses to engage daily in this or that activity is a private matter. One could even, heavens forbid, dedicate one’s life to battling injustice.
Among many left–wing populists on NationStates, terms like SJW, regressive left, and, perhaps saddest of all, feminist have become shorthand expressions for everything I do not like—and then some. People use these designations, while rarely (if ever) defining them, and assuming that the people deciphering these postings will share the identical definitions as the original writers. That is a feeble, and generally unjustified, supposition. Words, that is to say, are, in and of themselves, entirely devoid of significance. Instead, one makes up, concocts, the meaning in one’s mind. As an only recently awakened Autistic, new to the experiences of empathy and love, I adore all these people and, what is more, deeply identify with them.
I grew up, as an Autistic, totally unable to experience, or even to understand, empathetically. Beginning around the year 2000, I had a series of spiritual experiences, some during meditations and others during dreams and visions, which literally awakened me out of my plenary ignorance. I feel blissfully condemned to partake, almost constantly, in a life of empathy. These days, it bothers me, often tortures me, to see feminists and others who suffer being attacked, never loved, by socialist pretenders. Here is a typical, only slightly edited, response which I made to a left–wing populist, on the NationStates forum, who participates in the unfortunate, and all–too common, right–wing mimicry of bashing feminism and feminists:
Have you heard of socialist feminism, Marxist feminism, material feminism, and anarcha–feminism? No, I have not been asleep at the wheel, as you charged. However, I am an academic communist, not a left–wing populist. This forum has made me aware of a massive rift on the left. As a a New Leftist beginning in 1968, I was somehow previously unaware of it. NationStates has proved to be an awakening for me and, to be honest, a quite difficult, but necessary, one. No academic communists I know, and I literally know hundreds, would ever dream of attacking feminism. We view feminists as our allies or potential allies. Seeing feminists as anything less betrays every principle I have lived by since 1968. I will not change.
If a left–wing populist, a fascist, or, indeed, anyone for that matter, wishes to debate with you on their terms, firmly refuse. Should you consent, they will win. They know their rules much better than you do. Long after you are frustrated, they will be talking up a storm. Insist that they they dialogue with you under your directions. Lay out a regimen, and never back down. Gracefully escort them onto your turf of familiarity. Establish guidelines, and topics for discussion, which work to your advantage. In many cases, an unjustified self–confidence, sometimes conceit, will seduce the other person into acceding to your demands. At that point, the dispute has ended. You have now won the argument before it even got started.
A clique of over–rated pundits, hybrids of left–wing populism and neoconservatism, have launched a smear campaign against alleged regressive leftists. That pejorative is presumably intended to assail the fact that many academic communists, myself included, refuse to condone imperialist offensives of so–called liberation in predominantly Muslim countries and are Islamophiles, lovers of Islam. I publicly confess my sinfulness in this matter and ask, albeit sardonically, for absolution from these woefully misguided individuals. This wayward world, I suggest, has no place for the unscrupulous notions streaming from the collective consciousness of such persons. The cause is Western imperialism. Islamism is merely the effect.
Despite these harsh words, I oppose no one in particular. My enemy is the capitalist world–system, as an intersectional cartology, and the filth it embodies: racism, ethnicism, sexism, ableism, ageism, classism, nationalism, audism, sizeism, Islamophobia, heterosexism, lesbophobia, mentalism, neurelitism, and so on. If fascists, nazis, white identitarians, or alt–rightists sincerely choose to abdicate their odious ideologies and join the cause of democratic libertarian communism, I would welcome them with open arms. Revolutions are not, or should not be, vendettas. They are fought for transformation, emancipation, and eudaimonia in the human lifeworld. On that course, hate is a stumbling block, not a stepping stone to progress.
Ssalāmu ʿalay°kum, Mōšẹh ʾẠhărōn hạ-Lēwiy bẹn Hẹʿrəšẹʿl (Heb. 🙳 Yid., מֹשֶׁה אַהֲרֹן הַלֵוִי בֶּן הֶערְשֶׁעל), píra ū mur°šida 👳 🧕 🙇
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A ❤️ ḏik°r (Arabic, ذِكْر, remembrance): Yā ʾAllꞌahu, wa–yā Muḥammad, wa–yā Bāhū! (Arabic, يَا اللّهُ، وَيَا مُحَمَّد، وَيَا بَاهُو!) 🕍 📖

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Although Foster adores ⫰Islām ⅋ Taṣawwuf, he follows neither one.
Mōšẹh ʾẠhărōn hạ-Lēwiy bẹn Hẹʿrəšẹʿl is Foster’s communist name.
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Ţarīqāẗ ʾal–Bāhuwiyyaẗ of The Multiversal Communist Collective, Mōshẹh ʾẠhạrōn hạ-Lēwiy bẹn Hẹʿrəshẹʿl, Pír ū Mur°šid
The Gestalt Prayer by Frederick S. “Fritz” Perls